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Special Collections - Native American History: Indian Removal

Indian Removal

Indian Removal was a policy of the United States government in which Native American groups were to be removed from existing states and relocated to "Indian Territory" (present-day Oklahoma. Engineered by President Andrew Jackson, the plan became the centerpiece of the Indian Removal Act of 1830. The law targeted the "Five Civilized Tribes," the Chickasaw, the Choctaw, the Creek, the Seminole, and the Cherokee, and relocated these groups over the 1830s. The Trail of Tears, in which members of these tribes were forcibly marched from the American Southeast to present-day Oklahoma, is the most infamous aspect of Indian Removal. More than four thousand Native Americans died as a result of the Trail of Tears.

  • Georgia General Assembly, Appendix to the Senate Journal of the Session of 1826-7: containing messages and documents relative to the controversy between Georgia and the Creek Indians, 1827 (Williams SH 1550)
  • Indian Board for the Emigration, Preservation, and Improvement of the Aborigines of America, Documents and Proceedings relating to the formation and progress of a board in the city of New York, for the emigration, preservation, and improvement, of the aborigines of America. July 22, 18291829 (Williams SH 1574)
  • Jeremiah Evarts, Essays on the Present Crisis in the Condition of the American Indians1829 (Williams SH 1570)
  • United States War Department, Correspondence on the subject of the emigration of Indians: between the 30th November 1831, and 27th December 1833, with abstracts of expenditures by disbursing agents, in the removal and subsistence of Indians1834 (Williams SH 1640-1641)
  • United States War Department. Report of the Secretary of War: in answer to a resolution of the Senate calling for a list of the Creek Indian Warriors who were killed, wounded, or died in the service of the United States during the late war in Florida, 1848 (Williams SH 1567)